EP REVIEW - PINK FILMS - FROM THE TOP FLOOR EP



PINK FILMS

FROM THE TOP FLOOR EP

Brighton, United Kingdom




The new EP from Pink Films, ‘FROM THE TOP FLOOR’, is a sonic blend of textures and tones, with new wave rock/pop synths and progressions, adorned with smooth jazz instrumentals. This, coupled with a modern and crisp vocal, really brings ‘FROM THE TOP FLOOR’ into a class all its own.


‘Intro’, threw me. I instantly knew I was in for a very rich musical experience. The pads ease you in with calming shifts only for the drums and bass line to knock you sideways, the frills of piano chords juxtapose the tone and freshen the pallet. It is a fantastic opener. My only complaint is that there isn’t a 12” remix that’s nine minutes long.


Excited, you are pushed on into ‘Turquoise’. The opening is soft like you are looking at the colourful melodies through a linen curtain which then opens up as you pass through to an eclectic collection of percussion and guitar tones. A lot is bouncing around the room with the bass line taking the lead, then the drums, then the guitar comes back to have a say; perfectly blended chaos which the vocals tie together with calming vibes over a synth-pop backing, not unlike Tame Impala in its attitude. It works, and it works well.


‘Cherry Stands’, is my favourite track on the EP (I have a soft spot for beats with a push). It’s classic and well-rounded. Synth and guitar with a smile. Pink Films use a cultured blend of percussion throughout the EP but with the casual pacing of ‘Cherry Stands’, it’s plain as day that they really have a firm grasp on the sound they want to produce and by Jove do they get there with energy to spare. The harmonies accent the vocals, with organ-like synths at parts making the song feel almost angelic. Then a big heavy finish that I hope to hear fill a stadium one day. The finish is so big that Pink Films lets us breathe with a chill interlude titled, ‘1965’. A homage to eighties classics.


No time to sleep we’re back in it with, ‘M.A.D. (Movie’s Almost Done)’. The bass drum sets the pace and we’re treated to a tonal overload with audible film grain as if the song was plucked straight from the pop-fuelled eighties and it certainly could have been. Ahead of its time then and now. With a shifting melody that reminds me of Talking Heads with the texture and vibe of The Weekend. Also, this song has claps. Who doesn’t love claps?


I beg you, listen to the drums in ‘A Trip To Paris’, if you can keep your attention off of the encapsulating melody and vocals. For me, this song tied together twenty years of naughties angst. The heavy breaks and instrumental melodies are nostalgic with a twist, like a denim jacket you just ripped the sleeves off of. The drums tie it all together and shift through many classic beats leaving the song feeling new and familiar in hundreds of ways. A brilliant yet unfortunate end to a smashing EP. Unfortunate only in its brevity.


I for one cannot wait for more from Pink Films. ‘FROM THE TOP FLOOR’ is a prime example of Retro Future Synth-Pop. Pink Films’ focus on texture and simple melodies allows for the EP to have a timeless sound, one that I will keep coming back to for certain.


If you do yourself one favour today, listen to one song off of this EP. I’m sure you’ll listen to the next and the next and the next.